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Locky ransomware is dead, long live Locky

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The first wave of Locky has passed, but the ransomware is still being distributed globally and within the DACH region. While this secondary distribution seems to be smaller than the first wave, the financial success of this malware for its authors and distributors gives us some clues as to what features will likely be included in the NEXT rounds of malware. “Follow the money” was the key phrase in All the President’s Men, Robert Redford’s classic film on Watergate — and this very much applies to malware. These clues from Locky are a mix of technical, distribution, and operational features – and should be a warning for computer users and companies planning their defensive strategies.

1. Drive me baby – Locky encrypted all drives on computers and networks – even the unmapped drives and shares. This expanded reach for encryption is expected to be included in future ransomware variants.

Response: Have a solid backup plan in place, ideally with a cloud service, as they offer file versioning and rollbacks. For consumers, having a spare HDD/SSD for a local backup is fine – but only if the harddisk is disconnected after the backup is finished. This also protects the backup against damage from other dangers like lightning-caused electrical surges.

2. New money from old tricks – Locky went to work by directly using macros in Word documents – and also by tossing in a bit of social engineering to get document recipients to activate the macros. That is quite old school – but it worked and was profitable for the cybercriminals.

Response: While zero-day threats are sexy, don’t forget to do the basic protection against continuing vulnerabilities such as macro manipulation. Consider enabling only digitally signed Office macros and disabling the rest. For corporate networks, this can be done in a way where end users are not able to see this option.

3. What the FUD! – In the early moments of the Locky onslaught, security publications pointed out the low detection scores in VirusTotal by most antivirus companies. This is a valid – but incomplete – look at the situation. We consider Locky to be FUD-level malware (Fully Undetected Malware), which means that the malware files were “optimized” until no AV scanner detected them anymore. Cybercriminals are testing their malware samples against the publicly available detection in VirusTotal – or against private and internal testing systems that in a similar way. The low detection scores have to be read with caution. Only some of the AV firms have cloud detection or other advanced detection methods in their products enabled on VirusTotal – sometimes, just as in poker, it is better to not show your full capabilities.

Response: Be skeptical about everything and always keep your eyes open.

4. Wisdom from the cloud – Avira detects Locky on several layers within its cloud detection and analysis. At the Auto Dump layer, Locky is being detected after layers of obfuscation have been removed. In the Night Vision machine learning layer, files are scored according to around 7,000 features, allowing us to catch malware in a very efficient way. In case that other detection layers catch the malware first, the Night Vision system will dynamically learn about the sample within a few minutes, and subsequently cover variants of this malware sample. In addition, the cloud analysis is out of reach for the cybercriminals.

Response: For complete protection, make sure that the cloud protection in your AV is fully activated. We feel this is so important, we’ve automatically included our consumer users in the APC. Corporate clients must, for data protection issues, sign off that they approve the EULA before stepping into the APC.

Source : blog.avira.com

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